tanya madhani
Current: Staff Consultant @ Capgemini
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Movie Posters Redesign

As a way to marry two of my biggest interests (film and design), one of my ongoing projects is to remix the posters for some of my most formative movie-watching experiences.

Punch-Drunk Love

Punch-Drunk Love

the cinematography work on punch-drunk love is absolutely stunning. one of the things that has stuck with me ever since i first watched the film is the kaleidoscope-like transitions it makes in between scenes. I assume the sudden burst of abstract vibrancy is to portray Barry’s sense of freedom at having found the love of his life. he literally begins to see in bursts of saturated, abstractly shaped color.

For this design, I channeled those transitions to redesign my version of the movie’s poster and went one step further by hazing out the shapes of the figures and the colors to highlight barry’s giddy state even more.

Lady Bird

Lady Bird

Lady Bird is a quiet movie. When I describe the plot of the film to someone, it often sounds unremarkable: a girl from Sacramento wants to move to NYC for college and has friction with her mom about that decision. What makes Lady Bird an Oscar-nominated, beloved film is that its a sum of all of its excellent parts. As someone who grew up in a garden-variety suburban town, Lady Bird speaks to a very specific combination of frustration at your run-of-the-mill surroundings (the same mall, movie theater, restaurants, and people that have been so formative to my childhood and teenagedom) and the internal yearning to explore beyond the 20 square miles you’ve traveled most of your life.

For my design, I decided to depict the poster for this movie as a Victorian-era novella. I think the story of a young heroine navigating a new phase in her life is reminiscent of the adventures of self-discovery experienced by men in novels from that era. Taking aspects of design from that era — moody colors, silhouettes, repeated patters, and decorative font — this is Lady Bird’s poster re-imagined.

Little Women

Little Women

The 1994 version of Little Women starring Winona Ryder is one of my favorite Christmas movies of all time. I don’t think anyone can beat the comfort and warmth that comes with watching that movie on a snowy winter evening with a warm blanket and a cup of hot cocoa.

After having watched Lady Bird a couple of years ago and falling completely in love with it, as well as learning that Greta Gerwig was going to direct a retelling of Little Women, I became ecstatic at the possibility. So, I’ve designed a poster that emulates the photo composition of the Lady Bird poster (i.e. Soairse Ronan’s position away from the camera, facing her right) and mixing in the vintage era Little Women is set in.

The Before Trilogy

The Before Trilogy

Richard Linklater is at his best when he’s directing two different kinds of movies: coming-of-age period pieces (see Dazed and Confused, Everybody Wants Some!!) or films about how human connections are effected by the passage of time. While Boyhood is one of his most acclaimed films and the one that most would jump at in order to exemplify the latter category, his Before trilogy is very close to my heart. Jesse and Céline have a fairytale romance that spans years and their history seems so fantastical, that it’s almost science fiction.

For the design of this poster, I decided to create a watercolor effect and divide the page into thirds in order to represent each section of the trilogy. The only piece of real scenery in this poster is a cutout version of the bridge overlooking the Seine in Paris.

Devdas

Devdas

Imitation is the greatest form of flattery and Sanjay Leela Bhansali has plenty of his own copycats. When Devdas first splashed across Indian cinema screens, viewers were in awe of this new style of filmmaking. Sure, Bollywood had seen plenty of its own bombastic imagery — meticulously choreographed dance and action sequences galore — but, Sanjay Leela Bhansali married art and operatic films to create Devdas. In this film in particular, he combines the aesthetics of high-brow cinema with the melodramatic storytelling we all know and thoroughly enjoy. Well, when you’ve got Aishwarya Rai as a star in one of your films, you already know it’ll be beautiful.

For this poster, when I went in to design it, I knew I wanted to keep it simple. I didn’t want it to feature any stars’ names or the director’s name — the smoke type created enough character and intrigue to warrant an uncluttered page. To small lamp (or dia) takes the center (and only) stage on this poster as a way to emphasize the symbolic nature of this object in the film. Pay attention to this, the poster shouts to the viewer, it means so much throughout this movie.